• Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215
  • 617-667-4074
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Neuropsychiatrist
Clinical Fellow in Neurology, Harvard Medical School
Sidney R. Baer, Jr. Foundational Fellow in Clinical Neurosciences

 

Educational History:
BS, Neuroscience, Davidson College
PhD, Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina
MD, Medical University of South Carolina

Clinical Training:
Psychiatry Residency, Yale University School of Medicine

Clinical Interests:
Interventional Psychiatry
Brain Stimulation
Neuropsychiatry

Research Interests:
The term “interventional” has been used to define subspecialties of cardiology, radiology, and other branches of medicine in which procedural techniques are used to diagnose or treat severe or refractory disorders. Using a similar conceptual framework, my colleagues and I published the earliest manuscripts arguing for the creation and development of a procedural subspecialty within psychiatry. Broadly, my academic interests focus on advancing the field of interventional Psychiatry through education, research, integrated clinical care, and administrative leadership.

Most of my prior research focused on transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), but I remain interested in all established and novel forms of brain stimulation as well as rapid-acting pharmacotherapies. My research interests complement my extensive clinical training; I have delivered thousands of TMS, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and ketamine treatments to patients seeking relief from treatment-resistant symptoms. Moving forward, I plan to leverage my unique clinical expertise to design translational studies and clinical trials on naturalistic patient populations. One potential research strategy involves using novel neuroimaging techniques to study the convergent and divergent neural network effects of TMS, ECT, and ketamine on acutely ill patients with treatment-resistant depression. The broad aim of such studies would be to more effectively characterize disease states, predict treatment response, and optimize treatment strategies.